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Let hanging succulents hang free on your patio, in your kitchen & living room

Cascading succulents should be on anyone’s list for living home & patio decor.

Gardeners often focus on planting things in the ground or in pots that rest well below eye level, yet there is a wide (tall?) world of verdant, pendant possibility that lives above us in the form of hanging plants.

Particular varieties thrive from lofty perches, succulent plants such as string of bananas and Sedum ‘Burrito’. It’s enough to make one hungry! Hanging succulents also excel as “spiller” plants in dish gardens. It’s really hard to imagine potting more than one or two planters without having at least one. They do especially well in bright (but not necessarily super bright) kitchens, sun rooms, and other living spaces, making them some of the best succulents to treat as houseplants.

Many of these cascading gems are green. Green is an emotionally invigorating hue said to embody the rebirth and renewal of spring. That’s a lot to put on a color’s shoulders, but we garden enthusiasts of emerald hearts can’t help but feel an abiding affection for a color so intrinsically linked to a love of nature. Having seen brown landscapes perk up of late, we know that adding greenery at home can have a rejuvenating effect. Imagine coming home absolutely un-fabulously frazzled from work, only to lay your eyes on lush succulent leafy greenery. Ahh. We feel refreshed already.

Sedum ‘Burrito’

With cascading, dreadlock-like stems that can reach 3 feet and plump, densely packed foliage, this ‘Burrito’ has powdery-green leaves that turn brighter with sunlight. Mmm — part of that description has us thinking about a different kind of burrito. (Appetite is strong with this one.) The precise origins of Sedum ‘Burrito’ are a mystery … ooh, intrigue! … as it is said to have never been documented in the wild. But, boy, it sure is adored in human habitats. Just don’t involve it in a game of flag football or use it as a base in softball.

Treat the Sedum version well and you just might get pink-red blossoms on the ends of those “locks.”

 

Senecio rowleyanus (string of pearls)

Senecio rowleyanus, native to Namibia, Africa, has pendant stems to 3 feet or more with unusual round leaves giving the impression of beads, peas, or pearls. String of pearls is a superb subject for a hanging basket, and can be in the house in a bright airy room, or outside in a protected patio. Consider hanging several to create a sense of verdant greenery. Unless you’re on the coast, try to keep this one out of direct sun. But also watch that its soil doesn’t get soggy. If so, you’ll have rotten pearls on your hands. Or hair (if it’s hanging from above, that is).

When its round leaves are backlit by bright light, the translucent narrow little windows (there for aiding in photosynthesis) light up like little lasers.

 

Senecio radicans (string of bananas)

The stems of Senecio radicans have curious banana-shaped emerald-green leaves with fascinating translucent “windows” that aid in photosynthesis too. Those windows are to photosynthesis what the flux capacitor is to time travel. We’re pretty sure Dr. Emmett “Doc” Brown would agree with us. Flowers are like pom-poms of many tiny white flowers and are fragrant (cinnamon-y). Quickly forms plush hanging baskets. Hang a bunch to create a sense of lush (succulent) greenery, even mixing with Senecio rowleyanus (string of pearls) and Portulacaria afra ‘Variegata’. Thrives in a bright room or with morning sun on a patio in temperate areas.

Portulacaria afra ‘Variegata’

Portulacaria afra ‘Variegata’ (rainbow elephant bush) grows more laterally compared to the first two, but is still an excellent choice for hanging baskets. Its variegated creamy yellow/green leaves play off the green pendant senecios quite nicely. It’s known as rainbow elephant bush because elephants munch on it in habitat, even aiding in propagation when they trample on and break the mahogany red stems. Like with hanging baskets, it’s a must-have as a dish garden spiller or filler…one of the classiest succulent plants we’ve come across. Hang it by a sunny window or slider where the incoming light will provide a nice glow effect on the foliage.

 Senecio peregrinus (string of dolphins)

We’re going back to the Senecio genus to talk a bit about a variety that’s taken the succulent world by storm…or by pod. And that is the variety known as string of dolphins or dolphin necklace. Believe it or not (and you should!), the leaves resemble dolphins. Stem after stem of playful dolphins, the undisputed greatest living marine mammal…well, they’re dolphinately up there. (We’ll be here all week.) Give this one bright, indirect light and don’t let it dry out too much. Use a container that is just a bit larger than the plant, as dolphin plants thrive in slightly crowded conditions…like lovely, tiny, little, pods of dolphins!

At Altman Plants, in July we are planning to release our very first pod, er, batch of string of dolphins. Email us at online@altmanplants.com if you are interested in preordering one.

Crassula rubra marginata ‘Variegata’

So far we’ve focused on green hanging succulents, but here’s one that expresses beautiful pinks, roses, and purples, especially when given plenty of bright (but not punishing) light. The green, lemony cream and pink leaves of calico kitten blush a beautiful rose-lilac in drought or cold. This multicolored creeper is a go-to accent for hanging baskets and dish gardens, serving as an eye-catching contrast to rose-shaped succulents such as echeverias as well as upright growers. Excellent as a hanging basket or for spilling over the sides of a rock wall or along a dry creek bed. Tuck into the nooks and crannies of a waterwise garden where frost is not a concern.

 

Ceropegia woodii ‘Variegata’ (keepsake hearts or string of hearts)

Staying on the “not just green” tip, the cream, green & pink-margined Ceropegia woodii ‘Variegata’ is an incredibly beloved form. Easy to be when your leaves are shaped like hearts, right? If you can find one, you can grow it indoors near a window. The stems sport a purply hue. Another interesting facet is the production of tubers under the ground and at the base, giving it another nickname, this one “rosary vine.”

Other wonderful cascading succulent varieties include Cotyledon pendens, Sedum morganianum (thought to be a parent of Sedum ‘Burrito’), Senecio herreianus (string of beads, among others), Dischidia nummularia (string of nickels), and Othonna capensis (little pickles).

View the hanging succulents collection at shopaltmanplants.com here: http://ow.ly/CLBE30p0pII. For wholesale, visit cactusshop.com: http://ow.ly/gZMZ30p0pKA.

 

 

 

 

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Show us your DIY magic for our Holiday Decor Contest

We enjoy sharing our succulent craftiness on social media and the blog, but now we want to see yours! How exactly? Well, we are launching our DIY Holiday Decor Contest. We know there’s an amazingly creative minds and hands out there and we want to highlight and celebrate that talent within our virtual community of plant people.
 
Here’s how to enter. Find us on your favorite social media platform, as long as it’s Facebook, Instagram, or Pinterest. Send us a photo, by Dec. 31, showcasing your holiday-style DIY magic with succulents. It can be pretty much any DIY-style holiday-themed project, just as long as it involves succulents. We will be guided by a fairly broad interpretation of what it means to be holiday-themed.
 
So, for example, if you want to create a table centerpiece that will fit nicely at your family’s holiday feast, it need not incorporate a Santa Claus motif to qualify as a holiday centerpiece.
 
The method for entering will vary slightly, depending on which social media channel you choose. 
  • If you’re a Facebooker, simply post a photo to our page, or you can tag us (@altmanplants) in a photo on yours — in that case, be sure to set the post to public so we can see it. 
  • If you’re an Instagrammer, use the hashtag #altmanholidaycontest.
  • Should you be a master pinner, you can enter via Pinterest by using that same hashtag, #altmanholidaycontest, in your pin. 

There is no limit on entries. 

The grand prize: Altman Plants’ trio of 3.5″ rosette succulents in birch-style wraps

 

The winner will receive our three-pack of 3.5″ rosette succulents in birch-style wraps.

If you’re short on succulents at the moment but have a great DIY decor idea, we’ve lowered the minimum order for free shipping at shopaltmanplants.com to $50.

Whether it’s a wreath, succulent tree or centerpiece, or ornaments — or something completely different — we can’t wait to see it! Don’t hold back! Team Altman member Lee sure didn’t with his succulent Christmas tree. And no #fakesies! Happy DIYing!

 
 

 

 

 

 

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Give the gift of succulents

Can you believe the holidays are all but here? Good news for you: Succulents make super gifts for the favorite people in your life. These living treasures add gratifying, dramatic, year-round cheer and they do so without the need for batteries or USB cables or WiFi integration. And they don’t hit you up for attention during the holiday rush.
Our holiday collections (here & here) make gift giving simple, including succulents that arrive with their own cozy display “wrapping paper” — some in birch-style pot wraps, some in Grinch-inspired wraps. They’ll work splendidly as gifts and as living holiday decorations. And when the holidays end, remove the wraps and enjoy the plants all year long.
Begin your shopping for #holidaysucculents at our shop. Merry Succulenting!

The festive, Grinch-inspired holiday wrap & one of the birch-style wraps. View our entire Holiday Wrap Collection.

We sure wouldn’t mind coming downstairs to find succulents such as Aloe ‘Christmas Sleigh’ and Aloe ‘Blizzard’ under the tree. View our Holiday Collection.

Quirky varieties such as Kalanchoe tomentosa ‘Chocolate Soldier’, in the birch-style wrap, may delight the youngsters in your life and turn them on to succulents.

Sedeveria ‘Blue Elf’ blushing with excitement. Our collection of three rosette succulents in the birch-style wrap.

 

 

 

 

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Mimicry plants: succulent masters of disguise

The mimicry plants known as mesembs are the thespians of the succulent world, mind-blowingly adaptable actors often accustomed to harsh, sun-blasted habitats that receive only a few inches of rain a year. They grow in coarse sand with just their translucent tops showing, enabling sunlight to reach the interior of each plant. The rest is underground, which minimizes exposure to extreme elements.

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