Skip to Content

Blog Archives

Moon cacti: Put these colorful grafted creations in your orbit

These beautiful Gymnocalycium seedlings lack chlorophyll and therefore cannot survive on their own, but when grafted onto rootstock of Hylocereus cacti, the colorful, shade-friendly living lollipops can brighten up any room. Listen to our cactus whisperer Tom Jesch talk about this vibrant union of cacti.

Look for Gymnocalycium mihanovichii ‘Hibotan’ at our retail shop or wholesale shop

 

0 9 Continue Reading →

It’s a succulent sunrise: Anacampseros telephiastrum variegata

Kind of like a sunrise, or glittering jewels, this adorable little succulent lights up any nook or dish garden with a ravishing mix of pink, green, and creamy ivory or yellow. We’re pretty sure it’s not the sunrise the Eagles first sang about in 1973. Anyway, Anacampseros telephiastrum variegata, aka Anacampseros telephiastrum ‘Variegata’, aka Anacampseros ‘Sunrise’, makes a fine container specimen, clustering over time to form a dense mat and maybe, just maybe, trail over the edge. This slow-grower may also form, again with time, a caudex at its base. The pink flowers arrive in summer, waiting until afternoon to come out and closing back up around sunset. Contrasting against the foliage are filament-like white hairs.

The plant requires porous soil that drains quickly and it should be protected from frost. Unless you are in a temperate coastal or coastal-adjacent location, it’s probably best to keep this one in a dish garden or well-protected nook or cranny. Speaking of dish gardens, we have some choice pairing recs for any planter glittering with sunrise’s brilliant lanceolate leaves. There are several green or greenish echeverias that should pair well, varieties such as Echeveria ‘Lime n’ Chile’, E. ‘Cris’, E. ‘Haagaena’, E. ‘Irish Mint’…you get the idea. Sunrise with Senecio radicans (string of bananas) or Senecio rowleyanus (string of pearls) looks absolutely bonkers, in the best possible way.

Getting back on the Echeveria train, but not the green car, we also recommend E. ‘Chroma’ (those rose-pink hues would get along swimmingly) and E. ‘Black Prince’ (darker the better). Or pair it with something sporting a darker shade/hint of pink or red, like Gymnocalycium mihanovichii var. friedrichii. A black or dark burgundy aeonium amid a sea of sunrise would seem guaranteed to be a fabulous sight.

In the video below, our very own succulent whisperer Tom Jesch talks about this Anacampseros beauty’s variegated charms.

Look for Anacampseros telephiastrum variegata at our retail shop or wholesale shop.

 

 

 

0 10 Continue Reading →

It’s a succulent sunrise: Anacampseros telephiastrum variegata

Anacampseros telephiastrum variegata, an adorable little mat-forming succulent, lights up any space or dish garden with a ravishing mix of pink, green, and creamy ivory or yellow. It doesn’t tolerate intense heat or strong, direct sunlight for extended periods of time. Prefers bright, filtered light and temperate climates with ample airflow. Native to South Africa, occurring in much the same areas as the mimicry plants, or Mesembranthemaceae. Requires a porous soil that drains quickly. Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch. Protect from frost.

Look for Anacampseros telephiastrum variegata at our retail shop or wholesale shop

 

0 8 Continue Reading →

Light up your space with some juicy ‘Aurora’ sedum beans

Thanks to its darling little round leaves, Sedum rubrotinctum is affectionately known by monikers that may stir up one’s appetite, namely pork and beans and jelly bean plant. The cultivar ‘Aurora’ adds a dimension that has us looking skyward rather than to our bellies. As we understand it, this especially pink and cream version of S. rubrotinctum is named for the dazzling natural light show known as the aurora borealis (northern lights) or aurora australis (southern lights).

This ground-cover form doesn’t much reach for the sky itself, staying to around 6 inches high, but it will spread to 2 to 3 feet wide. ‘Aurora’ roots easily from wherever a stem touches the ground or from fallen leaves, giving you a gorgeous jelly bean mat of pink, light green, cream and apricot. Yellowish white flowers pop in summer.

In the video below, our succulent whisperer Tom Jesch talks up this low-growing spreader’s frosty, atmospheric colors. It just so happens that March is a popular period for aurora hunters, if they don’t already live in aurora-friendly places, to make their way to northern latitude destinations in countries such as Canada, Finland and Iceland for a peek at the northern lights. That’s if they’re fortunate, as it’s kinda hard to see that wondrous wash of color through persistent snowfall or cloud cover. That’s at least partly why communities make weeks or a whole month out of it by staging activities and festivals, like the monthlong Snowking’s Winter Festival in Yellowknife, Canada, 62 degrees north of the equatorial plane.

Look for Sedum rubrotinctum ‘Aurora’ at our retail shop or wholesale shop.

Photo by Frank Olson

 


 

 

 

0 7 Continue Reading →

Luminous jelly beans: Sedum rubrotinctum ‘Aurora’

Sedum rubrotinctum ‘Aurora’ is an especially pink cultivar of the stonecrop succulent known as pork and beans or jelly bean plant. This attractive ground-cover form should stay to about 6 inches high but it can spread to about 3 feet, in part because it roots easily from stems and leaves. 

Look for Sedum rubrotinctum ‘Aurora’ on our retail shop or wholesale shop

 

0 8 Continue Reading →

Garnish your garden with Echeveria ‘Lime n’ Chile’

Many of us enjoy a lime or lemon wedge with select tasty beverages, so why not enhance the look and liveliness of our succulent-adorned spaces in a similar spirit?

We heartily endorse Echeveria ‘Lime n’ Chile’ for this role. It forms frosty lime-green rosettes of chunky leaves, the tips of which may turn a spicy pink-red, and sends up coral & gold flowers. When clustered, this Altman Plants original hybrid provides quite the flower show, as each rosette can develop four to five inflorescences. Sometimes the leaves are slightly variegated, exhibiting a stippled appearance.

It looks especially saucy when paired with plants that play off its greenery. We particularly like a couple of green-tinged “players” from the genus Anacampseros for this role: A. telephiastrum variegata (sunrise) and A. rufescens. You may succulents in the coral-pink-red realm thriving at home that would go smashingly with it, like Graptosedum ‘California Sunset’ or rainbow hedgehog cactus. There are also fine candidates in the Aloe domain, such as dwarf hybrids A. ‘Delta Dawn’ and A. ‘Pink Blush’. Picking up and/or complementing the green foliage via a container will work to great effect too.

In the video below, succulent whisperer Tom touts this lime-green echeveria’s penchant for producing chicks.

Look for Echeveria ‘Lime n’ Chile’ at our retail shop or wholesale shop.


 

 

 

 

0 8 Continue Reading →

Add zest, spice with Echeveria ‘Lime n’ Chile’

Echeveria ‘Lime n’ Chile’ is an Altman Plants original hybrid that forms rosettes of chunky lime-green leaves and produces a veritable bouquet of tangerine/gold flowers.

Look for Echeveria ‘Lime n’ Chile’ on our retail shop or wholesale shop

0 7 Continue Reading →

Caught in the grip of succulent jaws

Faucaria tigrina (tiger jaws), a native of South Africa, is a clump-forming succulent with thick, fleshy, triangular green leaves that are lined with soft, recurved teeth. Watch our tiger jaws whisperer Tom get up-close and personal with this striking plant.

Look for Faucaria tigrina at our retail shop or wholesale shop. Read our blog post about Faucaria tigrina here.

0 7 Continue Reading →

A pet zebra for your home

Zebra plant was one of the species that turned our succulent guru Tom Jesch onto succulents. This haworthia can tolerate low light better than can most succulents, making it a fabulous choice for a spot indoors.

Look for Haworthia fasciata, or zebra plant, at our retail shop or wholesale shop.

0 5 Continue Reading →

Adorn your space with this little jewel of a succulent

Pachyveria ‘Glauca’ is a diminutive but distinctive gem

We succulent lovers sure do live in a golden age of gorgeous variety. Pachyveria ‘Glauca’, aka “little jewel,” is a Pachyphytum × Echeveria mash-up — a cross between two members of the family Crassulaceae.

0 9 Continue Reading →