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Winter is coming

But our treasured succulents don’t have to unduly suffer

We are fond of referring to succulents as the ultimate easy-care plants but many species can suffer serious damage or death if exposed to elements they aren’t predisposed to tolerate.

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Kalanchoe tomentosa: Give this fuzzy succulent softy a hug

While you may have seized the chance to admire a panda at a zoo, here’s a cute-as-can-be, touch-friendly “panda” of which you can get a really up-close peek … at your home. Every day.


Kalanchoe tomentosa, aka panda plant, is a succulent with long oval-shaped leaves that are densely covered in fuzzy felt. Kind of like a cat’s ears.

Panda plant may not be the flashiest succulent around, but it is certainly one of the fuzziest. And an indispensable, texture-adding accent in dish gardens to rose-shaped succulents like echeverias, graptopetalums, sempervivums and graptoverias.

Panda plant is a pretty no-fuss succulent that desires water only when its soil has thoroughly dried. When you do water, though, try not to soak its hair-laden leaves. The plant is frost-tender, so if you live in USDA Zone 9 or below, you’re going to want to protect it from frost or bring it inside for the winter, placing it on a sunny windowsill.

In the video below, our succulent whisperer Tom says the little hairs shade this dish garden champ’s foliage. 

Look for Kalanchoe tomentosa at shopaltmanplants.com: http://ow.ly/8DSx30pKPf2.

For wholesale visit cactusshop.com.

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Cutting loose: Winter growers wake up, become active in fall

Autumn has arrived at last. It feels good to be a succulent geek right about now, especially if you have a bunch of plants exiting summer dormancy. Nothing like looking forward to seeing your aeoniums, your senecios, your sempervivums, get a little wild in wintertime. Of course, for those in colder areas, that festival of life will have to be held indoors, in a space blessed with light.

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Easy-peasy succulent plants for beginners

  Beginners, black thumbs & back-to-school shoppers, this fleshy, fun, chill group is especially for you

Succulents have a rep for being waterwise, easy-care, easy-to-love plants. While all are easy to love, some are certainly easier to have looking their best than others.

The plants below are among the more kick-back, neglect-friendly succulents. Lovable living personalities for windowsills, sunny bedrooms, patios, kitchens, gardens, and other plant-worthy spaces.

Pick up your beginner-friendly succulents at shopaltmanplants.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Alliant Int’l University: The King of Succulents, Dr. Ken Altman

Original article published by Alliant International University

July 26, 2019

Article by Dr. Debra Kawahara, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs & Distinguished Professor at California School of Professional Psychology (CSPP)

As CSPP celebrates its 50th anniversary, I had the fortunate pleasure of connecting with Dr. Ken Altman. Dr. Altman is a CSPP alumnus from the founding class in Los Angeles. Born in Los Angeles, he went to UC Berkeley and then started at CSPP (pre-Alliant days) in 1970 and continued until 1976 when he received his PhD in Clinical Psychology. While in graduate school, he and his wife, Deena, started collecting and selling plants, eventually filling their backyard with mostly succulents and cacti. Once he graduated, he interviewed for a few jobs, but he soon realized that he really wanted to work for himself in the plant business. So, he focused and spent more time selling succulents through a truck route and a mail order catalog.

From these humble beginnings of selling plants from the back of a truck, Ken and Deena Altman have grown this one-time hobby and avid interest in plants to a wholesale nursery business that has more than 3,800 acres in 6 states. Altman Plants is now the nation’s largest horticultural grower and it specializes in drought-tolerant and water-efficient plants.

DK: What made you choose the field of clinical psychology?

KA: I was always interested in understanding how people think and I have interest in people’s stories.

DK: As CSPP was only in its beginning and you were a graduate in the first class, what made you choose CSPP in those founding years?

KA: I liked the emphasis on clinical studies, so it seemed like a good match.

DK: You then went on to become the largest succulent grower in the world. How did your career path lead you to become “The King of Succulents”?

KA: My wife and I have a tremendous passion for plants. A big work ethic combined with the patience to reinvest everything back into the business led to continuous business growth. We were not trained in the field of horticulture, so some things came with more difficulty. But at the same time, we were in position to create our own solutions, many of which were quite unique and creative and led to success. In addition to being the largest succulent grower in the world, we also grow annuals, perennials, and shrubs. Altman Plants is the largest horticulture business in the US now, with over 30 million square feet of greenhouse and over 6,000 employees.

DK: In reflecting back on your career, what are important qualities in being successful?

KA: Honesty, respect at all times for employees, vendors, and customers, a genuine interest in their success, work ethic, creativity in solving the problems our customers have, and a love of our product.

DK: What advice would you give anyone wanting to “go on their own”?

KA: Make sure you have a product that you stand behind and that has value to others. If you don’t have business experience, it wouldn’t hurt to read up or get mentorship. Make sure you have enough capital to support your life needs and to run your business. It generally takes three years to get a new business or business division to support itself well.

DK: Describe one of the most impactful/significant events in your career.

KA: Target stores was our biggest customer, representing around 35% of our business at the time. They decided to go out of the garden business. Things looked grim, but we were able to keep employees engaged. In the end, we replaced all the business, plus 15% more, and we were able to maintain everybody’s job. This was important because it was during one of the bigger recessions and people were very worried about whether they could find new jobs.

DK: Do you have any other thoughts to share?

KA: My dissertation was on Sexual Satisfaction in Couples. I compared an educational approach to an open free form “encounter group” approach. The educational structured approach showed more effect in helping couples. If I had stayed in the field, my interest in business would have led me to creating educational programs to help in many of the common problems for individuals, couples and families. I think that would have been very successful, but in the end, I am happy that I chose the nursery business and the enjoyment I have had in this field.

In closing, what is amazing to me, as Dr. Altman reminded me, is that when he began in the 1970’s, succulents were not as popular as they are now, but the Altmans stuck with it and they were able to gradually grow the business. Dr. Altman’s journey from clinical psychology graduate student to entrepreneur parallels the pioneering and innovative spirit of CSPP to the perseverance and persistence of excellence in professional psychology.

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Embrace positive vibes with succulents

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’re daydreaming about an endless summer day on a secluded beach. Gentle waves lapping near our feet. Seabirds carrying on delightful conversation. A pod of dolphins frolicking just beyond the surf.

Enticing aromas emanating from the grill. Sunscreen dutifully lathered on. And an umbrella placed to shade our succulent friends from afternoon rays. In this perfect world, our succulents are definitely coming with.

Embrace the summertime succulent vibes at shopaltmanplants.com.

Among the many succulent friends: Hang loose with Senecio rowleyanus (string of pearls) & Senecio radicans (string of bananas)

 

Echeveria minima hybrid itchin’ to hang 10 later

Embrace colorful, positive vibes with our Boho Tie Dye Modern Hippie Rosette Succulent 2 Pack With To/from Gift Card

Euphorbia anoplia and Pleiospilos nelii ‘Royal Flush’ are like quirky undersea creatures up for some sunbathing time. Be smart about it, you two!

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Rainbow Hedgehog Cactus Flower Time Lapse

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New mesquite hybrids show great promise as cash crops, lumber standouts

Mesquite trees are tough plants that survive and thrive in some of the driest and least fertile/saline habitats worldwide, sharing space with cacti and other tenacious, water-thrifty species.

They are also incredibly useful. Mesquites (Prosopis spp.), nitrogen-fixing trees to tall shrubs with thin, feathery, fern-like leaves, have long been valued as a resource for food, medicine, firewood, furniture, and other uses.

While considered problematic weeds in some areas, mesquites are useful for soil enrichment via nitrogen fixation, their bean pods are edible (by humans, wildlife, and livestock), and their wood is an excellent source for firewood as well as lumber for furniture. Other commercial income opportunities exist as well, including from intercropping, pod production and grazing. Planting thornless varieties, which we’re going to talk about in a bit, addresses one of the traditional issues ranchers have had with mesquites being located on lands used for grazing.

Mesquite hybrid ‘Mojave’ PPAF

When it comes to lumber, wood shrinkages are probably the best measure of wood stability, and because wood stability is one of the most important characteristics in furniture manufacture, Prosopis species belong in the company of the world’s finest indoor furniture species. This is especially so when Prosopis lumber’s stability is combined with its attractive reddish-brown wood color and above-average specific gravity and hardness.

Apart from their considerable commercial utility, mesquites are habitat promoters, producing wildlife-attracting beans and providing perches and nesting sites for flying friends, including hummingbirds.

All the benefits outlined above provide the basis for breeding research that builds upon what mesquite trees already contribute to the environments around them. With that, we’re excited to highlight two very promising mesquite hybrids that are close to being ready for everything from serving as cash crops on cattle grazing land to shading residential landscapes. These are drought-hardy, deep-rooted, nitrogen-fixing mesquite trees that have been bred to grow straight, fast, and without thorns. Did you know that mesquite trees are known to send taproots down almost 200 feet to locate moisture? Crazy, right?

 

Mesquite hybrid ‘Sonoran’ PPAF

Both plants are hybrids of a thornless, erect Texas native mesquite and a cold-hardy thornless Argentine mesquite. At 10 years old, under good tree parent care, they will sport a trunk diameter of 6 to 8 inches and rise to 20 to 25 feet in height.

Among the several specimens that resulted from this hybridization, ‘Mojave’ PPAF has the most finely divided lush foliage (more shade) and the fewest thorns (none). Compared to the other clones, it has a more compact canopy and less height potential.

The clone ‘Sonoran’ PPAF boasts greater height growth than ‘Mojave’, with more widely spaced leaflets. It would be desirable as an ornamental variety where a more airy, open canopy is desired. It has small spines (3/16 inch).

Both trees are summer lovers, handling heat up to 115 degrees Fahrenheit. At the other end of the temperature spectrum, they are considered hardy to USDA Zone 8b (average minimum temperature of 15 to 20 degrees). This includes all of Southern California; Las Vegas, Nevada; and Austin, Texas.

Oh, and speaking (again) of food, the pods of dried beans can be ground into a flour. Roasted pods can be milled into an aromatic flour smelling of cream, coconut and chocolate. And that is just a limited taste of mesquite trees’ value as a food source, to say nothing of the wood’s prized utility as a flavoring agent in the smoking of meats.

Perhaps in the not too distant future you’ll have yourself an airy, dappled shade-providing, heat-loving, thorn-free mesquite tree that will lend a distinctive twist to your homemade pancakes, pastries, and, yes, cookies!

The trees are available wholesale by contract. Please contact Bruce Gibson for ordering information at marketing@altmanplants.com.

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Product Highlight: Sensitivity Plant

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Mimicry plants: succulent masters of disguise

The mimicry plants known as mesembs are the thespians of the succulent world, mind-blowingly adaptable actors often accustomed to harsh, sun-blasted habitats that receive only a few inches of rain a year. They grow in coarse sand with just their translucent tops showing, enabling sunlight to reach the interior of each plant. The rest is underground, which minimizes exposure to extreme elements.

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